Superintendent: Assistant Pastor Jerald L. Bryant
Sunday Morning: 10:30 - 11:30 am
Christlike Ministries of Deliverance International, Inc.
Sunday School Department
Lesson: I Corinthians 12:14-31;
Time of the Action: 55 A.D.;
Place of the action: Paul writes to the church at Corinth from Ephesus    


By the end of the lesson, we will: LEARN how each member of the body supports the other members; VALUE the different gifts operating within the church; and USE spiritual gifts in cooperation with others for building up the body of Christ.

I. INTRODUCTION.   For many years Mrs. Parker had been a member of the church. Like clockwork she attended every Sunday service and was always on time. She attended special programs and was faithful in her tithes and offerings.
Yet, Mrs. Parker came to church, sat quietly, smiled, shook hands, and went on her way without becoming notable. While discussing church affairs one day, several members began to discuss members and their various activities. When Mrs.
Parker’s name came up, everyone mentioned how faithful her attendance was but how unproductive her membership seemed to be. Shortly thereafter, one evening she appeared at choir rehearsal. The music director attempted to stifle her
shock, but the members could not contain their excitement. As she settled into her section and the music began, it was immediately clear that Mrs. Parker was not just able to carry a tune, she was actually gifted to sing! After the rehearsal was
over, several members surrounded her, asking why she had kept her gifts secret for so long. She replied, “Well, nobody ever asked me to join, so I decided to give it a try. I hope you let me stay.” If we are to be unified in our faith, we cannot
overlook the value of our Christian family. We must never forget that we all have a part to play in the body of Christ.
       
Have you ever paid close attention to a football team playing offense?  As soon as the ball is snapped, everyone on the offense moves.  It may be nothing more than a routine running play, but every position plays a part in the success or
failure of the play.  On a football team, every position is important.  In a very real sense, this same level of participation should characterize the church.  This week’s lesson presents an analogy of the human body to teach an important lesson
about spiritual gifts.  Just as each member of a football team works together and is necessary, so the proper functioning of each part of the human body (even the seemingly insignificant ones) contributes to the health of the body.  The same idea
applies to the church.  Our lesson will stress the importance of believers maintaining spiritual unity as we minister our gifts to encourage one another in the church.



King James Version (KJV)

I.  THE WORTH OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:14-20)

14.
For the body is not one member, but many.  15. If the foot shall say, Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body? 16. And if the ear shall say, Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body; is it
therefore not of the body?
17. If the whole body were an eye, where were the hearing? If the whole were hearing, where were the smelling? 18. But now hath God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him. 19.
And if they were all one member, where were the body? 20. But now are they many members, yet but one body.

II. THE NECESSITY AND HARMONY OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:21-26)

21.
And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.  22. Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary:
23.
And those members of the body, which we think to be less honourable, upon these we bestow more abundant honour; and our uncomely parts have more abundant comeliness. 24. For our comely parts have no need: but God hath
tempered the body together, having given more abundant honour to that part which lacked.
25. That there should be no schism in the body; but that the members should have the same care one for another.
26.
And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.


III. THE GIFTS OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:27-31)

27.
Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular.  28. And God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondarily prophets, thirdly teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, governments, diversities of tongues.
29.
Are all apostles? are all prophets? are all teachers? are all workers of miracles? 30. Have all the gifts of healing? do all speak with tongues? do all interpret?  31. But covet earnestly the best gifts: and yet shew I unto you a more excellent
way.



New International Version (NIV)
I.  THE WORTH OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:14-20)                       

14.
Even so the body is not made up of one part but of many. 15. Now if the foot should say, “Because I am not a hand, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason stop being part of the body. 16. And if the ear should say,
“Because I am not an eye, I do not belong to the body,” it would not for that reason stop being part of the body.
17. If the whole body were an eye, where would the sense of hearing be? If the whole body were an ear, where would the sense
of smell be?
18. But in fact God has placed the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be. 19. If they were all one part, where would the body be? 20. As it is, there are many parts, but one body.


II. THE NECESSITY AND HARMONY OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:21-26)

21.
The eye cannot say to the hand, “I don’t need you!” And the head cannot say to the feet, “I don’t need you!” 22. On the contrary, those parts of the body that seem to be weaker are indispensable, 23. and the parts that we think are less
honorable we treat with special honor. And the parts that are unpresentable are treated with special modesty,
24. while our presentable parts need no special treatment. But God has put the body together, giving greater honor to the parts that
lacked it,
25. so that there should be no division in the body, but that its parts should have equal concern for each other. 26. If one part suffers, every part suffers with it; if one part is honored, every part rejoices with it.


III. THE GIFTS OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:27-31)

27.
Now you are the body of Christ, and each one of you is a part of it. 28. And God has placed in the church first of all apostles, second prophets, third teachers, then miracles, then gifts of healing, of helping, of guidance, and of different
kinds of tongues.
29. Are all apostles? Are all prophets? Are all teachers? Do all work miracles? 30. Do all have gifts of healing? Do all speak in tongues? Do all interpret? 31. Now eagerly desire the greater gifts. And yet I will show you the
most excellent way.



II. BACKGROUND FOR THE LESSON. Paul wrote I Corinthians because he was concerned about the church’s problems.  He had heard from members of Chloe’s household (see I Corinthians 1:11) that the church had serious divisions
with members divided over which Christian leader to follow (see I Corinthians chapters 1-4), sexual immorality was widespread (see I Corinthians chapter 5), and believers were taking each other to court to solve disputes (see I Corinthians 6:
1-11).  The church also had questions they wanted Paul to answer concerning marriage (see I Corinthians chapter 7),Christian liberty or freedom (see I Corinthians chapter 8:1-11:1), church worship (see I Corinthians 11:2-34), spiritual gifts
(see I Corinthians chapters 12-14), and resurrection (see I Corinthians chapter 15).  Some in the Corinthian church were elevating certain gifts above others.  They were also priding themselves when they thought they possessed what they
considered to be the most important gifts.  Paul reminded them that just as each of our physical bodies has many members and yet is only one body, so too in the church, the body of Christ, there are many members.  Each member is necessary
and therefore important to the proper functioning of the body.  After explaining the idea of gifts bestowed on believers by the Holy Spirit to glorify Christ (see I Corinthians 12:1-11), Paul likened the church to a human body with many
members or parts all unified in Christ (see I Corinthians 12:12).  In verse 13 Paul declares that all believers have been baptized by one Spirit into one body. This is where our lesson text begins.



III. THE WORTH OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:14-20)

 
A. One body, many members (I Corinthians 12:14).
        Our first verse says “For the body is not one member, but many.”  Paul begins to compare the human body, having many members but with different functions, with the body of Christ, which is made up of a variety of members.  No
one member of the human body can function alone.  The same is true in the body of Christ.  Every member is needed whether we think so or not.
 Note:  One member of the human body does not constitute a whole body and neither
can one member or body part function without the others.  So in the church no single individual should claim sole importance or ridicule others as unimportant.  All the members contribute to the effectiveness of the entire
spiritual body.  Churches need to apply this truth in several ways.  First, there is no place for a church dictator, whether pastor, officer, or influential laymen.  Second, there’s no place for being discouraged over a
seemingly lack of spiritual gifts, for no member is unimportant.  Third, there’s no place for laziness, for each member is needed.  Any one of these situations can cripple the body.


  B. Illustrations from the human body (I Corinthians 12:15-17).
       1. (vs. 15).  In this verse Paul says “If the foot shall say, Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body?”  In a comical way, Paul began to illustrate using human body parts how specific
members in the church need one another.  It appears that there were those in the church who made others who had gifts that were considered less important feel useless.  In his illustrations, Paul indicated what would happen if bodily organs
refused to do what they were designed to do.  Imagine the
“foot” saying “Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body.”  If this could happen, the foot would stop functioning as it should and the body would not work as it was
designed to work.  Paul then asked a rhetorical question,
“is it therefore not of the body?”  Of course the answer is no.  Even if the foot didn’t work, it would still be part of the body, just not a working part.  Note:  Something like this
was happening in Corinth.  Those who had what were considered spectacular gifts, like tongues or miracles, were exalting themselves.  Those who didn’t have the spectacular gifts became discouraged and felt that they
had nothing to contribute, thus depriving the church of the gifts they did have.


       
2. (vs. 16).  Paul continued his illustrations saying “And if the ear shall say, Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body?”  Again, imagine what would happen if the “ear” said “Because I am
not the eye, I am not of the body.”  
If this could happen, the ear would stop functioning as it should and the body would not work as it was designed to work.  Paul then asked another rhetorical question, “is it therefore not of the
body?”  
Like the first illustration, the answer again is no.  Even if the ear didn’t work properly it would still be part of the body, just not a working part.  Everyone would agree that both the “hands” and the “eyes” are essential parts of the
body.  But everyone would also agree that the
“foot” and the “ear” are needed as well.  Everyone knows that each member of the human body is important to the proper functioning of the body.  In the same way, each member of the body
of Christ is important to the functioning of the church no matter what spiritual gift they may have.
 Note:  Each part of Christ’s body has a unique and particular function or use.  Perhaps not every believer is as critical to the body’s
performance as are others, but all members have a vital part in the performance of the church’s ministry.

       3. (vs. 17).  
In this verse Paul went on to say “If the whole body were an eye, where were the hearing? If the whole were hearing, where were the smelling.”  By continuing his illustration using the human body and its members,
Paul showed how ridiculous it would be if one member of the human body tried to be the whole body.  If the eye tried to be the whole body, how could it hear?  And if the ear tried to be the whole body where would be the ability to smell?  In
each case, the apostle showed how absurd each claim made by the body part would be.
 Note:  To exalt one gift over another is absurd.  In the church too, it’s foolish to assume that healings, working miracles, or speaking in
unknown tongues are the gifts everyone should desire.  If that was the case, who will teach, exhort and pray?  Who will give to the needy or encourage?  Many areas of ministry would be left undone and the body of
Christ, the church would remain weak.  Any believer who thinks that their gift is the only important one is really destroying the spiritual body of which they are a part.  Church leaders should encourage all their members
to discover, develop, and use their gifts.


  
C. God’s sovereign distribution of the gifts (I Corinthians 12:18).  
       
Here Paul says “But now hath God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him.”  With the words “But now” Paul moved from the hypothetical illustrations he gave about the human body to what was
actually true.  The truth was that
“God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him.”  The verbs “set” and “pleased” are in the past tense indicating a completed specific act.  The fact that God has “set the
members every one of them in the body”
means that God has already decided the composition of the body, the church.  He has determined what members to include, where to place them, and what their functions are.  Paul wanted the
sinning Corinthian believers to know that members in the body of Christ don’t place themselves where they are.  Each member is placed where they are and gifted by God to perform a certain ministry.  The Christian’s duty is to recognize that
God has placed them where they are and seek to discover God’s gift to them through study, prayer, and wise guidance from God’s people.  Paul also said that God put each member where He did
“as it hath pleased him” meaning that it
was all according to His will.  Therefore, it’s terribly sinful to misuse other members and treat them and their gifts as inferior.

   D. The summary of Paul’s argument (I Corinthians 12:19-20).
       
1. (vs. 19).  Paul continues to say in this verse “And if they were all one member, where were the body?”  The apostle poses the question that if all the members of the body served as just a single member, having the same gifts,
where is the body?  Of course there would be no body.  In other words, no matter how important any one member may be, it cannot form a body by itself.  

      
2. (vs. 20). Now Paul says “But now are they many members, yet but one body.”  Paul was saying that as things stand right now, according to God’s will, there are many members who together make up one body.    


IV. THE NECESSITY AND HARMONY OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:21-26)

   A.  All members are needed (I Corinthians 12:21-22).
       1. (vs. 21).  In this verse Paul continues to say “And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.”  Again Paul compared the body of Christ to the physical
body.  Every single member of the body of Christ is needed.  There are no nonessential members of Christ’s body.  Therefore, Paul said an “
eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee.”  Yes, the eye sees what it wants, but
without the hand the eye can’t have what it wants.   Likewise, the apostle stated that “
nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.”   Even though the head has the ability to make decisions about which direction to take, without
the feet, the head would go nowhere.  Paul’s point is that the human body is incomplete if it lacks any one of its members.  The same thing is true of the church of Christ.  
Note:  The Corinthians needed to hear this over and over and
over again because many of them were proud of their so-called spectacular gifts while looking down on those who didn’t have the same gifts.  As a result, there arose divisions and factions (see I Corinthians 1:10-11)
which were even seen when they observed the Lord’s Supper (see I Corinthians 11:18-22).  In addition, the emphasis they placed on tongues led to disorderly worship services (see I Corinthians chapter 14).
 

        
2. (vs. 22).  Addressing his previous statement, Paul now said “Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary.”  With the word “Nay” Paul was saying no, on the contrary, “those
members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary
.”  The Greek word for “feeble” means weak or frail.  In the context of our lesson, it refers to unseen body parts such as the lungs, liver, kidneys, and others of like
nature.  Although these parts may not be visible, they are still necessary for life.  This is also true of many believers in the church body.  They may not be very visible, but their talents and gifts are essential to the proper functioning of the church.


   
B. All members are honorable (I Corinthians 12:23-24).
        1. (vs. 23).  The apostle goes on to say in this verse “And those members of the body, which we think to be less honourable, upon these we bestow more abundant honour; and our uncomely parts have more abundant
comeliness.
”  Paul was saying that there are some parts of the human body that we consider to be less honorable than others, but we give them “more abundant honour.”  In other words, the body has certain parts that we believe should not
be exposed so we give them “
more abundant honor” by covering them with clothes.  The word “uncomely” can mean “not so presentable” and also refers to the same body parts that “we think to be less honourable.”  In essence what
Paul is saying in this verse is that some members of our bodies are more presentable than other parts.  To the body parts that are less presentable, or “
uncomely” we usually give more attention by covering them with attractive clothing.  
***The point Paul is making is that those members in the body of Christ that are not as visible but are still essential, need to be honored for the service they render as they use their gifts which may not be as spectacular as others.***   

          
2. (vs. 24).  In this verse, Paul continues what he began in the previous verse.  He says “For our comely parts have no need: but God hath tempered the body together, having given more abundant honour to that part which
lacked.
”  In verse 23, Paul declared that our uncomely and less honorable body members are made more comely and more honorable by adding attractive clothing.  But here he says that our body parts that are “comely” or presentable don’t
need to be adorned because they are already attractive and presentable.  This is true in the church.  Those who have gifts that are considered spectacular and visible don’t need any special attention, they have plenty already.  Paul goes on to
say “
but God hath tempered the body together.”  This means that He has united and blended the body together and arranged it so that all body parts have honor.  God has done the same thing for the church, the body of Christ.  The
members all have different abilities, but God has so gifted the members that there is harmony, wholeness, and completeness.  The body of Christ then works smoothly and also presents a pleasing appearance to the world.  Simply said, all the
members are honorable.

   C. Avoiding schism (division) in the body (I Corinthians 12:25-26).
      
 1. (vs. 25).  Now Paul gives the reason why God sets the church up so that everyone is honored regardless of their gifts.  He said “That there should be no schism in the body; but that the members should have the same care
one for another.
”  The word “schism” means “division” (see I Corinthians 1:10).  Like the human body, God has so constructed and blended the body of Christ so that the parts or members work in harmony.  This avoids “schism” or
division.  God constructed the human body to avoid division or dissension between the members.  Likewise, it’s God’s will that the members of the church avoid division and promote unity.  Being united by God’s Spirit to work in harmony
together, God expects that the “
members should have the same care one for another.”  In other words, each member should show the same concern and care for every other member.  Unfortunately, the Corinthian believers were not
experiencing harmony and unity (see I Corinthians 1:11; 11:18).  The members of this church had all the gifts needed to exhibit harmony and unity, but they were spiritually immature, or babes in Christ (see I Corinthians 3:1-4).  Therefore, their
spiritual level didn’t match the spiritual gifts they possessed.   

       
2. (vs. 26).  In this verse Paul says “And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.”  Since God constructed and blended the parts of the human
body to be in harmony, Paul declared that when “
one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.”  When one member of the physical body or one member of the body
of Christ suffers, or is honored, all the members are affected.  If we feel no reaction to either one then we have a serious spiritual problem.  In his letter to the church in Rome, Paul encouraged the believers to “Rejoice with them that do rejoice,
and weep with them that weep” (see Romans 12:15).  Just like the human body, the body of Christ is one, with many parts or members.  For this reason, both the suffering and the honor of one member affects all the members to one degree or
another.


V. THE GIFTS OF THE MEMBERS (I Corinthians 12:27-31)

   
A. A listing of the gifts (I Corinthians 12:27-28).   
         1. (vs. 27).  Here Paul says “Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular.”  The fact that we “are the body of Christ” means that the church is a living, spiritual organism, getting its life from God and having Jesus as
its Head.  When Paul said that we are also “
members in particular” he meant that individual members within this organism have a vital role to fulfill.  However, it’s important that each believer know that he or she is only one member, not the
whole body.  The church needs contributions from all the members so that it becomes a healthy body, and its ministry glorifies Christ.


          2. (vs. 28).  
In this verse Paul listed some spiritual gifts that aid in the church’s health.  He said “And God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondarily prophets, thirdly teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of
healings, helps, governments, diversities of tongues.
”  These are not all the spiritual gifts, but it is representative of the gifts known by the believers in Corinth.  Other spiritual gifts are given in Romans 12:6-8, I Corinthians 12:8-11, and
Ephesians 4:11.  Before Paul listed these gifts, he made it clear that God gives the gifts when he said “And God hath set some in the church.”  The word “
some” indicates that God gave some of these gifts to various congregations as He saw
their needs.  Not every congregation had every gift (see Ephesians 4:11-13).  Spiritual gifts differ in their apparent value or importance and God chooses which Christians receive which gifts.  However, all Christians must be faithful in exercising
their gifts (see I Peter 4:10).  Paul was aware that the Corinthian believers were praising the lesser gifts simply because they were more spectacular.  This kind of thinking had to be corrected, so he listed the gifts beginning with the most
important ones according to those who possessed them.  According to importance Paul said that God gave “
first apostles.”  These were the men who had seen the risen Christ (see Acts 1:2; I Corinthians 9:1) and were commissioned by Him
to establish churches and give them His authoritative teaching (see Matthew 28:19-20: Acts 1:1-8).  “
Secondarily prophets” means that this was the second gift by rank and importance.  In the New Testament “prophets” were those who
received new revelation from God and shared it with the churches before the New Testament was completed.  They were not as much foretellers of future events as they were forth-tellers or preachers of God’s Word (see I Corinthians 14:3).  
Thirdly teachers” means that teachers were third in rank or importance.  “Teachers” were those who had the ability to expound and apply truth that has already been revealed by the apostles and prophets.  These first three gifts are ranked
ahead of the others because they are involved in communicating the Christian message.  Paul then said “
after that” or after these first three gifts God gave gifts of lesser importance, but were still needed in the church.  The first of these lesser
gifts was “
miracles.”  This refers to extraordinary manifestations of God’s power including exorcising demons (see Acts 8:7; 16:18; 19:12) striking someone with disease or death (see Acts 13:8-11), restoring life (see Acts 9:36-41; 20:9-10),
and warding off the effects of poison (see Acts 28:3-6).  Next was the “
gifts of healings” which refers to the ability to secure physical health for the afflicted.  They were sign gifts (miraculous gifts that could be witnessed) used to verify the
truth of the gospel (see Acts 3:6-9; 5:12-16; 9:32-35; 19:11-12) and also verified the apostles as true preachers of God’s Word (see II Corinthians 12:12; Hebrews 2:3-4).  For this reason, many believe that the “
gifts of healing” ceased
with the close of the apostolic age at the end of the first century.  Next in order was “
helps” which refers to all kinds of ministrations of service to other members of the body.  Then came “governments” which refers to the administration or
conducting of church business.  It’s interesting that we often regard this as a high office in human government, but the Bible gives it a lower ranking in the church.  Next Paul said comes “diversities of tongues” which means “
different kinds of
languages
.”  This gift was the ability given by the Holy Spirit to speak in known foreign languages that were unknown and unlearned by the one speaking.  This was the gift the apostles exercised on the Day of Pentecost (see Acts 2:4-11).  
This gift was especially useful for foreign evangelism (see I Corinthians 14:18, 21).  Let’s be clear, the gift was “
divers kinds of tongues” not “unknown tongues,” but undoubtedly this is what the Corinthian believers were speaking (see I
Corinthians 14:2, 4, 19).
 Note:  It’s very important to see that Paul ranked this gift last in importance of all the gifts, but unfortunately many in the church today as well as in Corinth, mistakenly consider unknown tongues,
as the only proof of the presence of the Holy Ghost.


 B. The importance of the diversity of gifts (I Corinthians 12:29-30).   
       
In these verses, Paul asked a series of rhetorical questions, all of which deserved a “no” answer.
          
1. (vs. 29).  In this verse Paul asked “Are all apostles? are all prophets? are all teachers? are all workers of miracles?”  Of course the answer to all these questions is no! However, by asking these questions Paul was showing
how ridiculous it was to think that everyone in the church had all these gifts.  The fact is that God has given gifts to all Christians, but not all Christians have every gift.  God in His sovereignty has given some gifts to some and some to others so
that we would have to depend on each other in order to make the church work and glorify Christ.

         
 2. (vs. 30).  In this verse Paul asked more rhetorical questions.  He asked “Have all the gifts of healing? do all speak with tongues? do all interpret?”  Again, the expected answer to each question is no.  Not everyone has these
gifts.  God only gives gifts to the members of a local church that are needed for that particular congregation and its spiritual growth.

 C.  Advice to the church (I Corinthians 12:31).
         In our final verse Paul gives the Corinthian believers a command.  He said “But covet earnestly the best gifts: and yet shew I unto you a more excellent way.”  The apostle was saying that the Corinthians were correct in desiring
and asking God for certain gifts.  However, he clearly advised them to “
covet earnestly the best gifts.”  The verb “covet” means “to earnestly desire.”  The Believers in Corinth desired and exalted tongues, which Paul said was a lesser
gift.  So he told them to desire the “
best gifts” meaning the gifts that are more beneficial to the body of Christ.  Those would be prophecy (forth telling God’s Word) and teaching (see I Corinthians 14:1-6, 9, 12,19, 22).  Paul concluded by
saying, “
and yet shew I unto you a more excellent way.”  Instead of desiring gifts that they thought were the better gifts like tongues, or miracles, Paul said he was going to show them a “more excellent way.”  In other words, the believer
shouldn’t worry about which gift they have because God makes that determination.  What is important is how we use the gifts God gives us.  In other words, the “
more excellent way” is how we use the gift.  In chapter 13, Paul would tell the
believers in Corinth that the “
more excellent way” or the best way to use our gifts is the way of love.  In essence, Paul was saying that we should desire the most useful gifts, but more importantly we should show love to one another when we
use the gifts we have.  For sure, there is no division or schism in love.



VI. Conclusion.  God gave special gifts to all believers as it pleased Him.  No matter what your gift may be, you have a vital part to play in your local church.  Any attitude of grumbling or superiority is out of place and unacceptable.  The goal
for each of us should be to use our gifts so that the body will function properly.  There is truly no hierarchy in the church, for we are equal partners in ministry.  We must use the gifts we have to serve the body of Christ in the very best way we
can under the Headship of Jesus Christ.


PRACTICAL POINTS:
1.  The Holy Spirit unites many members into the body to do God’s work (I Corinthians 12:14).
2.  Believers should neither boast of nor belittle their status in the body of Christ (I Corinthians 12:15-19).
3.  Every gift is critical to the healthy functioning of the church (I Corinthians 12:20-21).
4.  Behind the scenes work is often most critical to the success of a ministry (I Corinthians 12:22-24).
5.  The members of Christ’s body are inseparably bound to one another (I Corinthians 12:25-26).
6.  Believers must accept God’s gifts for them and not envy the gifts of others (I Corinthians 12:27-31).

Sunday, May 17, 2015
Members of One Body
I Corinthians 12:14-31
Golden Text: “Now ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular” (I Corinthians 12:27).
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Daily Bible Readings:
MONDAY
: Speaking with One Voice (Exodus 19:1–8)
TUESDAY
: We Will Be Obedient  (Exodus 24:1–7)
WEDNESDAY
: Sincere and Pure Devotion  (2 Corinthians 11:1–5)
THURSDAY
: Living in Harmony (Romans 15:1–7)
FRIDAY
: One Spirit, One Mind (Philippians 1:21–30)
SATURDAY
: One in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:23–29)
SUNDAY
: Many Members, One Body (1 Corinthians 12:14–31)  
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Examples: Psalm 27; John 15
love one another; Psalm 23

Say It Correctly
Schism. SKIH-zim.
Feeble.
FEE-bul.